Miles Teller Cast As Goose’s Son In ‘Top Gun’ Sequel

SOURCE: Vulture.comMiles Teller is feeling the need for speed.

After waiting over 30 years for a sequel to Tom Cruise’s highly popular Navy action film Top Gun, Paramount Pictures confirmed that a sequel was coming out next year titled Top Gun: Maverick and will be directed by Joseph Kosinski (Tron: Legacy, Oblivion).

But that’s not all they confirmed. They also announced that actor Miles Teller would be playing Goose’s son Bradley in the sequel as well.

Fans of the original Top Gun will remember that Maverick’s best friend Goose, portrayed by Anthony Edwards, died after an ejecting accident in the first movie. Although details for the sequel are kept under wraps, we do know that Tom Cruise and Val Kilmer are reprising their roles as Maverick and Iceman respectively.

And of course, Teller is involved with the project as well.

Teller is really starting to develop a name for himself as an actor. Making his debut years ago in the 2010 drama film Rabbit Hole, Teller has gone on to star in numerous successful projects, including the coming-of-age film The Spectacular Now, the musical thriller Whiplash, and more recently the military drama Thank You For Your Service. He even collaborated with Kosinski before on the firefighter picture Only The Brave.

All the same, I just don’t see the resemblance between Teller and Anthony Edwards. Other actors in the running included Nicholas Hoult and Glen Powell, and both of them look more similar to Edwards than Teller does. Teller, meanwhile, looks more like Tom Cruise than he does Anthony Edwards.

Granted, looks aren’t everything, and if we’re only looking at talent exclusively, then Teller’s got that in spades. Still, it never hurts to look more like the character you’re related to, and when the movie comes out, that is an obstacle Teller and crew will have to overcome together.

What do you guys think? Are you excited to see Teller hop into a fighter jet, or do you wish he would have stayed grounded? Comment below, let me know.

– David Dunn

SOURCE: The Hollywood Reporter, Entertainment Weekly
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“THE INCREDIBLES 2” Review (✫✫✫)

SOURCE: Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures

One childhood later…

Can a good thing come too late? You tell me. Can a thief return your wallet after spending all of your money? Can a firetruck put out the fire after your house already burned down? Can a lover apologize after admitting to cheating on you? The answer is yes, a good thing can absolutely come too late. And like Syndrome once said a long time ago, Incredibles 2 came too late: 15 years too late.

In perhaps the most unnecessary sequel since Cars 2 (oh yeah, I went there), Incredibles 2 picks up right after the Incredibles encountered the Underminer at the end of the first movie (which is incredibly frustrating, since Violet, Dash, and Jack-Jack haven’t aged a day, whereas I’m so old that I’ve grown a beard). Despite saving the day not once but twice, supers are still outlawed by the federal government and are still considered menaces to society, despite the good that they try to do.

Enter Winston Deavor (Bob Odenkirk), a telecommunications CEO and super-fan that wants to legalize superheroes and bring them back into the spotlight. Pouring his investments into a massive PR campaign to make supers well-liked again, Deavor enlists in the help of Helen Parr, a.k.a. Elastigirl (Holly Hunter) to carry out missions and change the public perception of superheroes. With Elastigirl busy out superheroing, Bob (Craig T. Nelson) is left at home to watch over the kids, and despite being Mr. Incredible, he is certainly not the most incredible Mr. Mom.

First thing’s first: Incredibles 2 looks gorgeous. That’s to be expected of course, considering we waited a decade and a half for the bloody thing to come out. Regardless, the visual feats Incredibles 2 achieves are nothing short of spectacular. It not only deserves to be compared to its predecessor, but it demands to be seen as superior.

The action is much more proliferate in Incredibles 2, and that’s generally to be expected, considering how heavy a role the action played in the first Incredibles. Still, I was impressed at how unique and clever the spectacle was and how Pixar didn’t just repeat themselves from the first movie. In one exhilarating chase sequence, Elastigirl was chasing a runaway train on her Elasti-cycle, which separated into two halves, allowing her to make flexible leaps with her torso while driving. That was an incredibly inventive way to use Elastigirl’s abilities, and I caught myself being on the edge of my seat as I watched her leap on top of cars, railroads, and buildings chasing the train. My favorite scene from the film had to be when the adolescent Jack-Jack’s powers were emerging and he fought a raccoon rummaging through his trash in the backyard. No, this is not some special, super-powered raccoon. It’s just a super-baby fighting an everyday, average, frightened raccoon. Rocket from Guardians of the Galaxy would have been mortified.

The visuals and the action were great in the the first Incredibles, and they’re just as fantastic to watch here. Where its sequel begins to falter is its plot. Unlike the first movie, where its writing was fresh, organic, and addressed real-life family issues and emotions, Incredibles 2 feels too generic for its own good; like it knows it has to churn out a sequel and just came up with the most basic concept it could just to save time on its production schedule. Now don’t get me wrong, I wasn’t expecting anything ground-breaking with Incredibles 2. Lord knows the movie could have been The Godfather of animated superhero sequels and still not be up-to-par with the first movie. Even with that expectation, however, I was disappointed at how unspectacular the film’s premise really felt.

Take for example the movie’s villain Screenslaver (Bill Wise). Simply put, he’s your average supervillain megolomaniac, a guy conjured up just to fight our heroes with nothing more to add to their personal stakes. Compared to Syndrome from the first movie, who had a traumatic childhood experience where he reasonably felt betrayed by his heroes, Screenslaver simply does not have the gusto to be a driving force behind this movie’s conflict. Yes, his powers are interesting and unique enough to control the supers against each other. So what? That doesn’t make him a compelling character, and his motivations for fighting the Incredibles are just plain weak. One of my best friends even turned to me in the theater and told me how he thought the movie was going to end. Sure enough, the film ticked on like clockwork, and my friend’s predictions almost happened word-for-word.

I’m not surprised by the simplicity of this film’s story. Quite honestly, I was expecting it. What I am surprised by is how long it took for writer-director Brad Bird to make this. It’s been 14 years since The Incredibles came out. Since then, Bird has released multiple stellar pictures, including the masterful and moving Ratatouille, the exciting and revitalizing Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol, and even the mediocre Tommorrowland was filled with vision and imagination. Time and time again, Bird has proved his worth as a creative storyteller. And you mean to tell me you waited half of my literal life span for the right inspiration???

Sorry, I’m not buying that. I was Dash’s age when the first Incredibles was released, and now here I am older than Violet, expected to feel the same way about it when I was younger. Real life doesn’t just pause like that. Even Toy Story 3, which also had a 10-year release gap between Toy Story 2, had the good sense to fast forward in time with its characters. That’s because as Andy grew, so did we. I was a little kid playing with my favorite toys when Toy Story 2 came out, and then I grew up, becoming a young adult by the time Toy Story 3 was released. I even graduated from high school the same year that Andy did. But with The Incredibles, there is no growth, no reflection that we’re supposed to look back on. I’m just an adult expected to go back in time to my youth so I can feel the same about The Incredibles as I did when I was 11. How is that reasonable? How is that fair?

I’m tasked with answering the most basic question here: Is Incredibles 2 good? The simple answer is yes, it is very good. Like the first movie, Incredibles 2 is fast-paced, funny, and exciting, further challenging the blurred lines between animated and live-action films and what they can accomplish for their audiences. The complicated answer is that its quality doesn’t matter. I’ve long left my childhood behind, just like millions of eager fans like myself have years ago. Time has passed. We’ve already grown up. And Incredibles 2 means less to us now than it would have if it were released seven or eight years ago.

In either case, be on the lookout for Incredibles 3 in the future, where it will undoubtedly come out when I turn 60.

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“THE INCREDIBLES” Review (✫✫✫✫)

SOURCE: Buena Vista Pictures

Mister and Misses (Plus the kids)

I’ve never seen a film like The Incredibles before, and I doubt I will ever see another one like it again. Oh, don’t get me wrong, I’ve seen plenty of my fair share of superhero movies before, including more recently X2 and Spider-Man 2. But The Incredibles in particular is special even compared to those movies. Like Toy Story, Monsters Inc., and Finding Nemo, The Incredibles challenges the visual and emotional capability of the animated motion picture and asserts it as equal to its live-action peers, and so it is. The Incredibles has earned every right to be compared to the likes of Superman, Batman, Spider-Man, and the many others that will come after it.

Taking place in a world where Supers are as common as regular folks are, The Incredibles follows one super-heroic family trying to re-accommodate into normal American life. Bob Parr, a.k.a. Mr. Incredible (Craig T. Nelson) is the super-strength super-dad of the family going through a mid-life crisis of sorts, while his wife Helen a.k.a. Elastigirl (Holly Hunter) is just trying her best to be a good housewife and mother for her kids. Speaking of the kids, they’re facing adolescent issues of their own, with the force-field wielding Violet (Sarah Vowell) struggling with her shyness around a school crush, the speedster Dash (Spencer Fox) frustrated that he isn’t allowed to participate in school sports, and the baby Jack-Jack (Eli Fucile)… well, everything and anything that can go wrong with being a super-baby.

One day, Bob gets a secret message enticing him back into superhero work, despite it being outlawed by the federal government. Reminiscent of the old days of superheroing and wanting to give it one last go, Bob suits up as Mr. Incredible and sets off for one incredible adventure with his family.

The visuals are nothing short of astounding in this movie. Just like with Toy Story and Finding Nemo, The Incredibles is a colorful, vibrant adventure beaming with impressive detail and saturation. Yet, even by Pixar’s already impressive standards, The Incredibles still manages to stand out. How? Simple: the speed and motion of character’s animation is fast-paced and exciting, on-par with other superhero fan-fares that features similar exhilarating action.

It doesn’t take long for us to notice this. In fact, in the first 10 minutes alone, Mr. Incredible 1) Saves a cat from a tree, 2) Stops a high-speed car chase, 3) Interrupts a rooftop robbery, 4) Saves a citizen from leaping off of a building, 5) Fights a super villain in the middle of a bank heist, 6) Saves a child from a bomb attached to himself, 7) Stops a train from derailing off of its tracks, and 8) Makes it just in the knick of time for his own wedding. When I say this movie feels like the Spider-Man, X-Men, or Superman movies, I mean it. This movie is so exciting to watch that you feel like it can compete with most action movies, let alone animated ones as well.

I wondered why this movie felt so different compared to the rest of the animated genre? It doesn’t feel like its aimed at children, after all. What with its highly-stylized action violence, explosive spectacle, and more darker, mature moments, I wondered why this felt so adult-oriented despite its PG rating? Then I remembered: this film was directed by Brad Bird, who also helmed the animated science-fiction film The Iron Giant years ago. Like The Iron Giant, The Incredibles is a movie filled with ambitious vision; daring in its visual art and far-reaching in its emotional range. In many ways, they’re both very similar films. They both portray the modern American family robbed by normalcy and dysfunction. They are both thrown into extraordinary circumstances that they find mesmerizing and fascinating. And ultimately, they pull themselves out of their dire situations through the greatest superpower of all: family.

You’ll also notice how the movie has an aesthetic that satires 90’s spy movies such as James Bond and Mission Impossible. I wasn’t sure how exactly that was going to work for an animated superhero movie like The Incredibles, but it works beautifully. The scenery evokes the feel and grandeur of MI6 headquarters, while the Incredibles’ gadgets are reminiscent of the toys that Q provides Bond to bring with him on his missions. Speaking of Q, there’s a spoof of the character here named Edna Mode, who’s hilariously voiced by Brad Bird himself, and she provides a personality so melodramatic and overbearing that she couldn’t help but remind me of those high-strung fashionites not unlike Edith Head or Anna Wintour. And the music by Michal Giacchino is especially sleek and snazzy, with its jazz horns blaring and its drums beating like those smooth spy jams you listened to growing up.

Go and see The Incredibles. My review cannot get much simpler than that. It’s an exciting, action-packed, suspenseful, funny, and wildly entertaining thrill ride that not only blows most of its animated competition out of the water, but also most of its live-action superhero counterparts as well. To put it in one word, the movie is simply… incredible.

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Joke’s On You: Joaquin Phoenix Cast As Martin Scorsese’s Joker

We’re going to be getting a lot of Joker for the next several years.

Several projects attributed to Batman’s arch-nemesis has been making its way out of the woodwork for the past several weeks now. For one thing, DCEU confirmed a Joker spinoff following Jared Leto’s portrayal of the character after his debut in David Ayer’s Suicide Squad. The character is also reportedly rumored to make an appearance in upcoming movies from DCEU’s slate, including Suicide Squad 2, Gotham City Sirens, and The Batman.

Beyond that, however, there’s another Joker movie that functions as a prequel and is being produced by Martin Scorsese (Goodfellas, Wolf of Wall Street) and directed by Todd Phillips (The Hangover trilogy). The casting for Martin Scorsese’s Joker has just been announced, and it is none other than Walk The Line actor Joaquin Phoenix.

At first glance, this casting seems like an odd choice to play the Joker, especially in a Martin Scorsese production. With roles in movies including I’m Still Here, The Master, and Her, Phoenix is more recently known for playing the introverted, quiet character. He isn’t really known for playing extroverted, animated characters outside of Gladiator and Walk The Line. With that in mind, it seems odd to cast him as a psychotic criminal who wears a purple suit and clown makeup on his face.

That is until you realize this is a Joker prequel, and most of the scenes presumably are going to portray the character before he took on the villainous mantle. Rumored to be loosely adapted on The Killing Joke storyline by Alan Moore which showed the Joker before going on a downward spiral of madness, it’s very possible that Phoenix’s portrayal is just going to be a regular old Joe that has one very bad day that transforms him into the Clown Prince of Crime. Through that scope, Phoenix’s casting is pitch-perfect, and it will be fascinating to see how he slowly turns from a Gotham City everyman into Batman’s greatest nemesis.

What do you guys think? Are you excited to see Phoenix become the Joker, or are you going to skip it in favor of Jared Leto’s portrayal? Comment below, let me know.

– David Dunn

SOURCE: The Independent, Screen Rant

Ewan McGregor Cast In ‘The Shining’ Sequel

Ewan McGregor is having a great year.

First, he’s starring in the titular role of Walt Disney’s upcoming live-action Winnie the Pooh movie Christopher Robin. Then Disney announced an upcoming Obi-Wan Kenobi movie, which is potentially looking at McGregor to reprise his popular role. Now he’s being tapped to play the lead in the upcoming sequel to Stephen King’s horror saga, The Shining.

Indiewire first broke the news that McGregor officially signed on for the role of Danny Torrence in Doctor Sleep, which shows what happens to an older Danny and his mother after his father Jack (Jack Nicholson) goes mad in The Shining. Details of the film are still being kept under wraps, however much of it is expected to loosely follow the events of the book which it is based on. It’s also going to be written and directed by horror filmmaker Mike Flanagan, who gained notoriety years earlier for directing the slasher film Hush and Stephen King’s Gerald’s Game.

Ewan McGregor? Stephen King? The Shining? Yes please, sign me up for all of it. Stephen King has had no shortage of success in the film industry, his most successful adaptations including The Shawshank Redemption, Misery, The Mist, Carrie, and more recently It. Hearing that we’re going to get more Stephen King horror goodness is exciting enough on its own. The fact that an actor as talented as McGregor is going to be on board with it is downright heart-stopping.

What do you guys think? Are you excited that McGregor is going to be entering the Stephen King universe, or do you wish they’d leave King’s classics alone? Comment below, let me know.

– David Dunn

SOURCE: IndieWire, Entertainment Weekly

“SOLO: A STAR WARS STORY” Review (✫✫)

SOURCE: Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures

Ron shot first.

There are two key problems with Solo: A Star Wars Story. First, nobody asked for nor wanted a Han Solo movie. Second, this isn’t a Han Solo movie. If it were, it would have the real Han Solo in it with Harrison Ford, or at the very least, somebody who looked like him. As it stands, all we have is the kid from Hail, Caesar! wearing a Han Solo costume playing pretend on a film set. A more accurate title for this film would have been Star Wars Cosplay: The Movie.

The plot follows a younger Han Solo (ish) played by Alden Ehrenreich, growing into the smuggler that we know of before the events of the original Star Wars. The film shows us everything that has made Han Solo (ish) become Han Solo, from how he got his name, to meeting Chewbacca (Joonas Suotamo), to where he got his signature blaster, to getting the Millennium Falcon. Because, you know, all of those were glaring questions we had from the first eight movies.

There are several things wrong with Solo: A Star Wars Story, but let’s start with its execution. Reportedly the biggest point of contention between producer Kathleen Kennedy and previous directors Phil Lord and Chris Miller, Solo was previously going to be handled in a loose, improvisational style similar to Thor: Ragnarok. After Kennedy got fed up with Lord and Miller’s direction and fired them, she brought on Academy Award-winner Ron Howard (A Beautiful Mind, Rush) to finish production, sticking closer to the script and deviating less from what was on the page.

That’s a problem for Solo, because the script is monotonous at its best and insipid at its worst. Written by veteran Star Wars scribe Lawrence Kasdan and his son Jonathan, Solo is a muddled, incoherent mess, forcing an explanation for every small, insignificant detail that never came into our minds. Some scenes were done well, like when Han met Chewie for the first time after the Wookies were forced out of Kashyyyk in Revenge of the Sith. Other scenes, however, are downright pompous and silly. For instance, were you ever curious how the Millennium Falcon got its iconic shape (besides being simply designed that way)? Did you know that a giant squid was chasing the Falcon during the Kessel Run, as if it wasn’t impressive enough that it ran it in 12 parasecs? And what about the biggest shocker: how Han Solo got his name? Hint: his parents didn’t give it to him.

All of this leads to the core issue here: who, in their right science-fiction fanboy mind, wanted a Han Solo prequel? I would think that out of all of the Star Wars characters, Solo is the least you would need backstory on next to the Skywalkers. What was the point of all of this? Was a prequel so desperately necessary that we needed an explanation for every single mundane detail surrounding Han Solo? Did this story really need to be told? Did Harrison Ford’s legacy really need to be brought back from the grave just so it could be tarnished at the box office?

Speaking of Harrison Ford, Ehrenreich is downright cringeworthy as the younger Han Solo. And to be fair, it isn’t his fault. Hell, it was damn near impossible from the get-go making a Han Solo movie without Harrison Ford. But it wasn’t completely hopeless. Australian actor Anthony Ingruber gave a great Han Solo impression way back in 2008, and he even impeccably mimicked Harrison Ford’s mannerisms in 2015’s Age of Adaline. So a movie portraying a younger Han Solo wasn’t completely out of the question; only far-reaching at Galaxy length.

So what went wrong with Ehrenreich’s portrayal? Besides looking nothing like Harrison Ford, his mannerisms are completely wrong. When you look at the smooth, coy, inherently self-centered smugness of Ford’s Solo in the original trilogy and compare it side-by-side with this kid, you see a guy tripping over his blaster pretending to be a character he isn’t. Ford was cool and confident. Ehrenreich was clumsy and clueless. Ford was sharp and smooth. Ehrenreich was awkward and out of place. Ford has personality and attitude. Ehrenreich had no personality and wishes he had attitude.

Admittedly, not everything in Solo was terrible. The visual effects are impressive as always, and the action is fast, thrilling, and exciting to watch. The small Easter Eggs scattered are about as fun as they always are, with one cameo from the prequel trilogy in particular surprising me quite a bit. And the performances outside of Ehrenreich’s are mostly reliable, with Donald Glover shining in particular as he channels Billy Dee Williams into a younger, spunkier Lando Calrissian (although he had a romance with a droid character that felt, for a lack of a better word, artificial).

All of this just further reinforces how unnecessary Solo: A Star Wars Story was. Again, why was this movie made? A fan of the franchise could not give you an answer that would make any sense. Walt Disney Studios, meanwhile, could give you several reasons relating to the box office. Pray that the studio doesn’t decide to milk the franchise any further to the point where we’re getting a Jabba the Hutt movie. And before Kathleen Kennedy asks, no that was not an actual recommendation.

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“DEADPOOL 2” Review (✫✫✫)

SOURCE: 20th Century Fox

Really? Three stars AGAIN?!

SCREW David Dunn. First, he has the balls to give Logan half a star higher than my first movie after it rode MY R-rating (Yeah that’s right, you’re a freeloader Hugh Jackman), but then his balls grew to tumor-size to give my second movie the same rating?!?! WHY DO YOU KEEP DOING THIS TO ME, DD???

First, don’t compare my initials to a bra size. Second, since you basically did the same thing twice, so am I (hence why we’re also having this conversation a second time).

Oh, shut up. I have Josh Brolin and a metal arm! Doesn’t that count for something?!

Not particularly, since the Marvel Cinematic Universe also has both of those things. What’s he doing in your movie again?

He time-traveled from a dystopian future to kill a kid and save his timeline.

So… he’s the Terminator?

Pretty much, yeah.

Gotcha. So, run the whole thing by me again. How exactly is Deadpool 2 different from the rest of the superhero genre?

I’m glad you asked! First, [INSERT SPOILER ALERT] dies at the beginning of my movie! Second–

That’s already happened.

I beg your pardon?

[INSERT SPOILER ALERT] dying at the beginning. That’s literally happened in every superhero movie like… ever.

Baloney sandwich. Name ten.

Superman, Blade, Spider-Man, Batman Begins, X-Men Origins: Wolverine, Guardians of the Galaxy, Batman V. Superman, Captain America: Civil War, Black Panther, and Avengers: Infinity War. The last two, by the way, were also released this year and are better than both of your movies.

Curses. Outdone by Disney again.

Not for much longer, I suspect.

Okay, but what about everything else in the movie? The action? The drama? The jokes? The Easter Eggs? The cameos? I mean, you HAD to enjoy all that?!

Actually, I did, and I suspect your fans will enjoy it just as much as well. Profane, loud-mouthed, and obnoxious as you are Wade, the one thing you keep proving is that you’re consistently funny. And man, did you have me rolling on the ground laughing. I really liked the opening sequence where you spoofed the James Bond credits, and how you parodied team-up movies like The Avengers and X-Men by bringing together the X-Force. And don’t even get me started on how you commented on the financial stinginess of 20th Century Fox.

Hahaha, hell yeah. Thanks Double-D, I’ll take that fourth star now.

Sorry Wade, but no can do. That’s only reserved for movies that I feel really deserve it.

WHAT THE ****, YOU ************** *** ** * *** ***** *******, WHY DOESN’T DEADPOOL 2 DESERVE IT?!?!

Wade, it’s the same movie. It’s the same freaking movie. Deadpool 1 IS Deadpool 2. You even bring in the same roided-out Russian at the end to solve all of your biggest problems.

Ah, yes. Just like Donald Trump.

Please keep the politics to a minimum, Wade.

Alright, so give it to me straight. What do I have to do to make you give me four stars and an MTV Movie Award?

Wade, I don’t think it’s about a star rating. You found your niche. You’ve made not one, but two fantastic movies that deliver a hilariously violent spoof of the superhero genre. Yeah, it’s not quote-unquote “outstanding.” So what? Maybe the fact that you aren’t some profound, emotional, culturally relevant blockbuster isn’t your weakness: it’s your strength. Maybe you don’t need to be like Captain America, or Spider-Man, or Iron Man, or Wolverine. Maybe you just need to be yourself.

… it’s because I’m white, isn’t it?

Wade.

It’s because I’m white.

I’m very uncomfortable talking about this.

Is that why you gave Black Panther four stars?

I’m done with this conversation. Hit me up when you release X-Force. And a four-star movie.

Oh, you piece of—

I’m sorry, I couldn’t help myself.

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‘Star Wars’ FINALLY Gives Boba Fett His Own Movie

SOURCE: Comic Book Movie

As the opening weekend for Solo: A Star Wars Story quickly approaches, another Star Wars character was added onto the lineup for their own solo feature. That character is none other than the fan-favorite bounty hunter Boba Fett.

Finally.

The Hollywood Reporter broke the news that not only would Boba Fett get his own feature film, but that it would also be written and directed by James Mangold, whose most recent Wolverine film Logan garnered critical appraise and earned a best screenplay nomination at the Academy Awards. X-Men and Sherlock Holmes screenwriter Simon Kinberg was also listed to produce and co-write the film as well.

Honestly, at this point hearing that a Boba Fett movie is getting made at all is reason enough to be excited. When LucasFilm originally confirmed Rogue One and Han Solo prequels for its spinoff series separate from the main Star Wars storyline, fans were understandably wondering why on Earth the studio didn’t start with a Yoda or Boba Fett prequel, considering that so little is known about those characters to begin with. While wait, Yoda will, for his own solo feature, the fact that Boba Fett is finally put on the drawing board is cause for celebration. Solo: A Star Wars Story tickets, anyone?

But more than that, the fact that they brought on Mangold and Kinberg straight from the get-go is cause enough to take a breath of fresh air and feel assured that the movie is in good hands. Kinberg has been involved in writing and producing several of the X-Men films, from X-Men: First Class all the way to Deadpool 2. His involvement in the production is definitely something to look forward to, but it’s even more exciting knowing that Mangold is going to be the one behind the camera. Besides The Wolverine and Logan, Mangold has also directed several other successful features, including the psychological thriller Identity, the Johnny Cash-biopic Walk The Line, and the western remake 3:10 To Yuma. The guy has a very solid and strong career behind him. With his hands on Boba Fett, there’s no telling where he can take it, besides a galaxy far, far away.

It’s unclear if they will bring back Temuera Morrison to portray Boba Fett for the film, who previously played his father Jango in Star Wars: Attack of the Clones. But what do you guys think? Are you excited we’re finally getting a Boba Fett movie? Or do you wish he stayed buried in the stomach of the Sarlacc Pitt? Comment below, let me know.

– David Dunn

SOURCE: The Hollywood Reporter, IGN

Avengers Assemble: Top 10 Marvel Cinematic Universe Movies

If you had told me in 2008 that Iron Man would propel a cinematic franchise that’s made more money and movies than the Star Wars, Batman, and Harry Potter franchises, I would have laughed at you all the way to class. “How could that be?” I would’ve asked. “Marvel doesn’t even own the rights to its most popular character, Spider-Man!” A decade later, I’m eating my words, and I couldn’t be happier for it.

It’s amazing to see how far Marvel has come since then. Avengers: Infinity War is the 19th film in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, and later this year, Ant-Man & The Wasp will be the 20th. That means Marvel has pumped out an average of two films every year since Iron Man’s release. The fact that Marvel has pushed out that many movies is impressive enough on its own. The fact that nearly all of them were as financially and critically successful as they were makes their feats all the more impressive. Before Marvel, Star Wars was the highest-grossing film franchise at $8 billion. The MCU has blown that away with a whopping $15 billion.

To say that Marvel has become successful at the movie business would be a severe understatement. It became successful, stacked billions of billions of dollars on top of it, threw on a cosplay, then break-danced in front of the movie theater like it was Flash Gordon. I would go so far as to say it’s the only considerable force at the box office. Even when you include Star Wars as competition, Walt Disney still owns both of those properties. So who else is there to offer serious cinematic competition at the likes of Disney?

With Avengers: Infinity War releasing past week and quickly on its way to grossing one billion dollars at the box office, it’s worth taking a look back at the Marvel Cinematic Universe’s best. So without further adieu, here are my Top 10 films from the Marvel Cinematic Universe.

– David Dunn

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Star-Lord Confirms ‘Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 3’ Is Filming Next Year

WARNING: SPOILERS AHEAD FOR AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR.

For those of you still in shock after watching what happened at the end of Avengers: Infinity War, don’t worry. Here’s some news that might pick your spirits up just a little bit.

In a recent Instagram birthday message to co-star Pom Klementieff, Chris Pratt, the actor who plays Peter Quill a.k.a. Star-Lord in the Guardians of the Galaxy movies, confirmed that not only is writer-director James Gunn working on the script for the third Guardians of the Galaxy movie, but that the Guardians will actually begin filming for it next year as well.

For those of you that aren’t confused at reading this, that’s probably because you haven’t watched Avengers: Infinity War yet. With that, this is your last warning.

SPOILERS AHEAD FOR AVENGERS : INFINITY WAR.

At the end of Avengers: Infinity War, Thanos wins against the Avengers, collects all of the Infinity Stones, and uses them to wipe out half of all life in the universe. This includes half of the known superheroes as well, which of course includes the Guardians of the Galaxy. With the exception of Rocket, who remains on Earth with Steve Rogers, Bruce Banner, and Thor, the rest of the Guardians disintegrated thanks to the Infinity Gauntlet, including Groot, Mantis, Drax, and Star-Lord.

Since the Guardians were killed at the end of Avengers: Infinity War, however, how is it that they’re all back for Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 3? My guess is that their deaths, as well as everyone else’s, will be undone for the sequel Avengers 4. After Thanos wiped out half of the universe in the comic books, Nebula gets ahold of the Infinity Gauntlet and uses the Time Stone to undo everything that Thanos has done up until then. Since the title and premise for Avengers 4 is still being kept heavily under wraps, it’s impossible to know whether the newer movies will follow this storyline or not. Nevertheless, it’s safe to assume it will follow some loose adaptation of the storyline, and that it will lead to the Guardians getting resurrected in time for their third movie.

What do you guys think? Are you excited to see the Guardians come back from the dead, or do you expect the sequel to introduce a new team of Guardians to the Galaxy? Comment below, let me know.

– David Dunn

SOURCE: Sceenrant, MovieWeb
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