Category Archives: The Scope

9.11.2019

A year ago, I visited the 9/11 Memorial and Museum in New York for the first time in my life. The experience, of course, was emotional for everybody inside that museum. Names and faces filled out the walls like memorials too small to fully encapsulate and appreciate the lives that were drastically cut short. Remnants of the attack were scattered around the museum as if it were ground zero. Harrowing video and audio clips looped over and over again, capturing the horror of the day in vivid, haunting detail. It was a powerful experience, and it stays with you long after you’ve left the museum.

Yet I had a different reaction from others at the museum. I could see veterans crying, visibly shaken by how this horrible event continues to haunt the country they love to this very day. I watched families mourn for the loved ones they missed on the walls, children confused by the sadness surrounding them.

Yet despite all of the grieving around me, I didn’t cry inside the museum. Not once. I was actually a little disturbed at myself, to be quite honest. Somebody even questioned me about my reaction, asking me why I wasn’t overcome with emotion like everyone else was around me?

I WAS overcome with emotion; just not in the outward, visible way others were. I have a tendency to internalize my feelings and thoughts, and while everyone was saddened and consumed by everything that we had lost, I was instead focused on what this catastrophic event has meant to us all these years and what it will mean to us going forward.

And every time I looked at the names, the faces, the clothes, the debris, and the videos, a heartbreaking thought crossed my mind that devastates me every time I think about it:

The terrorists won.

Before you react, let me clarify what I mean by that. Before and after the attack, Al-Qaeda clearly stated that their intentions were to weaken the United States for their actions against Iraq and Saudi Arabia. They aimed for targets that were symbolic and significant to our nation. The Pentagon for its strength. The Capitol Building for its democracy. The Twin Towers for its prosperity.

Sure, part of their goal was to hurt America deeply and profoundly; wound it so much to the point where it collapsed to the ground in loss and despair. But it wasn’t just that. After all, we are a formidable force to be reckoned with. Destroying the United States, therefore, was an unrealistic goal, despite how much they may have wanted to.

No, their goal was much more specific — much more intentional. What, you may ask? And the answer is simple: they wanted to cripple us, and they utilized the most potent tools at their disposal to do it. Those tools weren’t knives. They weren’t box cutters. They weren’t even the airplanes themselves.

No, their goal was to cripple us using fear. Using anger. Using hatred. These are potent weapons, because their effects last much longer after their use.

For a time, their attack failed and their cause was lost. America was united in its grief and came together stronger than ever, rebuilding our world and striving towards a better one tomorrow. But somewhere along the way, we lost that unity and that sense of respect and decency. We let fear takeover. Our anger festered and grew. And the seeds of hatred spread so deep that it tore away at our roots, weakening us much more than it ever had before.

The terrorists won.

And they’ve been winning ever since.

I’ve been replaying that moment in the museum over and over again in my head, strategizing how we may overcome our shortcomings and make sure our enemies lose, this time for good. A year later, I still don’t have the answers. I fear I will be old and gray before those solutions present themselves.

I know this much: we cannot win using the enemy’s weapons. Every time we give in to our primal instincts, we lessen ourselves as a country and weaken the foundations that made us so great in the first place.

Instead of fear, we should turn to understanding.

Instead of anger, we should turn to patience.

Instead of hatred, we should turn to love.

And instead of isolation, we should turn to unity in the founding principles that made this country great and rely on them like a bedrock. We need those foundations now more than ever.

The terrorists won.

But they don’t have to.

And one day, I pray they won’t.

– David Dunn

Final Thoughts On Chadwick Boseman

It’s been three days now and I’m still not over the death of Chadwick Boseman. Like Heath Ledger in 2008 or Robin Williams in 2014, Chadwick’s death came from left field out of nowhere, surprising everyone with a colon cancer diagnosis he received even before his debut as Black Panther in the 2016 superhero epic Captain America: Civil War. Even today, the world feels lesser without him in it. I myself still struggle knowing that we’ll never see T’Challa again on the big screen, despite his triumphant return in last year’s Avengers: Endgame.

Out of all of the things 2020 has taken from us, I didn’t think Chadwick would be one of them. Yet, here we are. As we try to process this tragedy and work towards moving forward together, let’s reflect on the lessons that we’ve learned from Chadwick and what his example has grown to mean with comic book and movie fans everywhere.

Top 10 Oscar Wins Of The Decade

There aren’t many good moments to pick from Academy Awards history. Whether it’s Seth McFarlane hosting the ceremony or Faye Dunaway flubbing up the Best Picture winner, the Oscars are filled with one maddening, cringe-worthy moment after another. That’s part of why the good moments are so endearing and memorable, despite also being so far and few in between. With the 93rd Academy Awards postponed to April 2021 (potentially even further with how the rest of 2020 is going), now is a great time to reflect on the 2010s and go over the 10 best Oscar wins of the decade. Spoiler alert: I’m not wearing pants while I’m making the list.

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May The Fourth Be With You.

SOURCE: Lucasfilm

This video was a hard one to do. Not just because of all the filming, editing, and effort that usually goes into long-form content like this, but more of the emotional story behind it that kept pushing this video out weeks after weeks after weeks.

I was originally supposed to publish this video ranking all of the Star Wars movies at the tail end of 2019, around the same time when Rise of Skywalker came out. But for those that know me, I was dealing with a lot at the time that prevented this video’s release. For one thing, I lost my Grandmother, or “Ducky Schwartz,” to respiratory complications. I still miss her dearly, though I am glad she doesn’t have to go through this pandemic at the very least. I lost my best friend. And to top it all off, I got into a car accident that wrecked me financially.

The holiday season passed (quite possibly the worst one I’ve ever experienced). January rolled around and I just got back on my feet. I was ready to film this video albeit a month later, but at least I was making progress. Then at the end of my recording session, all of the video footage got corrupted and wasn’t usable. So I had to reset and film the whole thing all over again.

A string of health problems prevented filming until March, and then I finally had all of my video clips and was ready to import the footage. Only problem was, for some inexplicable reason, my computer wouldn’t download all of the video clips. I have no idea why. But I had to pull out my other computer and download the rest of the footage from there. Halfway through downloading, my computer crashed and wouldn’t turn back on. I was so emotionally exhausted and frustrated that I couldn’t contain myself. I had a meltdown and completely broke down in my living room. I just felt so powerless. After dealing with one traumatic incident after another, all I wanted to do was shoot and edit a damn video, just to get my mind off of things. But I couldn’t even do that.

I was eventually able to restart my computer and download the rest of the footage several days later, but by then I couldn’t care less. I was so emotionally drained from the experience that I just shut out my computer and put the project on the back burner, focusing instead on my work and mental and emotional health. These videos haven’t done a damn thing for me, I thought. Why would I waste any more of my time and effort on them?

Fast forward to April, where we’re in the heat of dealing with this pandemic. Finally locked into my room with my own thoughts, feelings, emotions, and videos, I finally found the strength to return to my project and finish what I started. Video editing is not easy, and for those that are unfamiliar, it typically takes an average of one hour to edit one minute of footage. So I decided to take my time and just bite off one piece at a time. Two weeks later, I finally realized my vision for my ranking of the Star Wars series.

And yet, technical mishaps would strike yet again and try to stop me one last time. I finalized my remaining graphics and was ready to export my video. Only one problem: my computer wouldn’t boot up. I tried everything that Apple support suggested, but despite exhausting all options, the computer remained inaccessible, making a weekend’s worth of editing completely pointless.

So I pivoted, fired up my other computer, edited the video from a backup, implemented the graphics, and finally published my video against all odds. Suck it, Apple. Your shoddy hardware couldn’t stop me from sharing my love of Star Wars. 

Why am I sharing all of this? Because out of all the videos I’ve produced, this is the one I’m most proud of by far. Every conceivable obstacle was thrown into my path for this video, from personal to physical to technical. And despite all of those roadblocks, I was able to persevere and do what I love most: talk about movies.

I don’t know how much more I’ll resume video work after this. The experience has been so emotionally taxing on me that I question how much longer I want to do this, if I even want to keep doing this at all. I still want to publish roundups for the decade as well as the Oscars, though now I’m questioning whether I want to do those in alternative formats to avoid further stress and frustration.

But I’ll leave those questions for tomorrow. For now, I’m proud of what I’ve produced, and I’m proud I got to share my love of Star Wars and the movies with you once again.

Thank you all for continuing to support me and watch my videos. I genuinely appreciate it, and it has kept me going in these very difficult past few months.

Anyhow, enjoy my ranking of the Star Wars movies. Happy Star Wars Day, and of course, May The Fourth Be With You.

– David Dunn

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Coronavirus Contagions

It’s time we face the facts here: the coronavirus is not going away anytime soon. Since it first surfaced in Wuhan, China in December last year, it has gone on to infect over 308,000 people across the globe, killing over 13,000 of them. And since it has come to America earlier this year, the United States went from having less than 10 cases in January to now over 26,000 cases this month. For those of you not keeping up with the math, that’s faster than even Italy’s growth rate.

What does that mean for us? I’m not exactly sure. Since earlier this month, the coronavirus seemed like an afterthought, a distant threat that was impacting other countries but mostly remained separate from ours. Now it’s reshaped almost everything in our everyday life, from working from home to delayed movie releases to even shopping for groceries. Just a few weeks ago, my biggest frustration with the coronavirus was how it delayed upcoming movie releases such as James Bond’s No Time To Die and A Quiet Place Part II until the fall. Now my biggest fear is contracting the virus myself, or even worse, spreading it to somebody else.

There are some positives to glean from this. For one thing, the majority of people who contract the coronavirus only suffer from mild symptoms, with 81% of victims eventually recovering from the disease, according to the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention. It still remains to be one of the low-risk diseases globally, with the SARS and MERS epidemics killing between 10-30% of its infected, both significantly higher than the coronavirus’ 4% fatality rate. And numerically, it is still one of the less deadly diseases, with thousands of people dying daily from both AIDS and the seasonal flu, whereas on the coronavirus’ worse day it hasn’t even topped a thousand yet.

So in terms of globally and nationally, the coronavirus is still relatively low-risk. But I don’t want to shortchange this threat. The most concerning thing about it, of course, is that it’s asymptomatic, which means you could have it and not even know it. This doesn’t mean much to you, of course, but it could jump from you and infect somebody close to you that is more vulnerable to the disease than you are, such as the elderly and those with pre-existing conditions.

We’re also not prepared if this outbreak grows to exceed Italy’s numbers, as hospital beds, respirators, and ventilators are overwhelmingly short on supply. This is before you even get into the fact that we’re working with incomplete numbers since testing for the disease is even more scarce than hospitality availability. And don’t even get me started on the ramifications of President Trump’s decision to fire the pandemic response team in 2018.

This is all before you even get into the economic impact of the coronavirus. Since the virus has broken out, many local governments and municipalities have forced local businesses, shops, stores, gyms, and hotels to close down, while limiting many restaurants to takeout and delivery only. This will leave a massive hole in both our local and national economies and most likely will lead to a recession and maybe even a depression. Many people are pushing for government bailouts, but that can only last for so long. It’s funny how those who were decrying the threats of socialism are now happily willing to accept it, so long as they get a paycheck from it.

Look, I don’t want to start a panic, but we also need to be practical at what we’re facing here. The fallout from the coronavirus will be significant. Whether it is in the form of further infections, massive unemployment, or social and economic collapse, the hammer will drop somewhere in some form as a result of this virus. In its best-case scenario, the coronavirus will inconvenience America – indeed, the whole world – for the next several months. At its worst, it will reshape our entire society as we know it.

Where does that leave us? For now, everyone needs to stock up, keep their heads down, and distance themselves from the rest of the outside world. That will be difficult for some extroverts that need human connection, while it will just be everyday life to some introverts like me. Regardless, limiting the spread of the virus is the best way to fight it at this moment. Even if the pandemic spreads into the coming months, it will at least be contained enough so hospitals will be able to treat patients without overwhelming the healthcare system.

As for myself, I don’t know what I’m going to do yet. I publish on this website to bring you the most up-to-date information on new movies and theater releases, but since there won’t be many in the foreseeable future, that puts me into a bit of a pickle. Even if movies are still coming out like Wonder Woman 1984 is this summer, I doubt I would go to the movie theater to see them. That just wouldn’t be the smart or safe decision at this point.

No, instead I think I might focus more on recent releases I’ve missed reviewing, like Onward, The Invisible Man, and Sonic The Hedgehog. I’d also like to focus more on video work as well since I have yet to do my best and worst movies of the decade lists. Heck, I still want to review that disaster of a Cats movie that released that December. Did you know that there’s a cut of that movie out there where the cats’ buttholes were not digitally removed? I didn’t know it was possible to make that movie any more horrifying.

I’ll figure out what I’m going to do for this website in the coming weeks. But for now, stay home, keep yourselves healthy, and don’t unnecessarily put yourself at risk of the disease.

Stay safe out there, fellow movie lovers. I’ll let you know when my review of the butthole cut of Cats is coming out.

Love,

David

‘Parasite’ Creeps Into Top Honors At 92nd Academy Awards

I gotta say, I’ve covered the Academy Awards for a long time now. Year after year, I watch as they award their Oscars to winners both old and new. I see them give their statuettes sometimes to those that are most deserving, other times to nominees that couldn’t be less deserving. And with each passing ceremony, there isn’t one where the Academy doesn’t spring at least one surprise on its unsuspecting viewers.

Take this year’s awards, for example. Not only is this the first year where a comic-book film was nominated the most (Joker with 11 nominations), but this is also the second year where the Academy led its ceremony without a host. Last year it was to the ceremony’s benefit, as the awards carried out at a brisk pace while simultaneously being quick-witted and funny. This year, however, the awards seem airy and directionless, like they were scrambling to get through all the categories and find some loose way of connecting them together.

Don’t get me wrong, some of the presenters were very funny, like Will Ferrell and Julia Louis-Dreyfus when they confused the cinematographers and film editor’s jobs, and James Corden and Rebel Wilson, who came out in these awful-looking Cats costumes and stressed the importance of good visual effects. Other times presenters seemed random and pointless, like when Kelly Marie Tran and Anthony Ramos came out to present… another presenter. 1917 actor George Mackay illustrated the monotony of the presentation brilliantly, saying he was a “presenter to present another presenter who was going to present… another presenter.”

But the Hollywood elites who read from the envelopes this year were the least of the night’s surprises. In fact, the biggest surprises of all came from a film that I wasn’t even expecting to win the night’s top prizes:

SOURCE: CJ Entertainment

Best Picture: The Academy’s top honor didn’t go to 1917, a beautifully-filmed war epic that captured the essence of its tragedy in one seemingly endless shot. It didn’t go to the witty and wild love letter to 60’s cinema Once Upon A Time In Hollywood. And it also didn’t go to a movie about the mental descent of one man that would grow to become Batman’s greatest nemesis in Joker. No, the Academy instead chose to give the night’s highest recognition to a film you probably haven’t even heard of: South Korea’s harrowing yet hilarious commentary on classism and economics, Parasite. 

This is significant for a few reasons. One: Parasite is so out of the box and so unusual for the Academy that you wonder if their tastes are changing for the new generation. It’s strange that the Academy has gone a whole decade without recognizing at least one war film like 1917, or that it wouldn’t take up the chance to be self-absorbed in their own culture with Once Upon A Time In Hollywood like they were with The Artist or Birdman. But Parasite is just such an unusual choice for the Academy. Take away the fact that it’s a Korean film for one second: the fact they would even consider an exercise in minimalism and implication like this is so out of left field for Academy voters. If it wasn’t, then why wasn’t Get Out awarded Best Picture in 2018? Or The Revenant in 2016?

Two: Parasite is the first foreign-language film to have won Best Picture… ever. That is a stunning title for it to own, especially when you consider the fact that the Academy has overlooked nominees such as Roma, Amour, Babel, Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, Life Is Beautiful, The Postman, and several other films dating all the way back to 1938. This also does not consider outstanding foreign-language films that weren’t even nominated for Best Picture, including A Separation, Pan’s Labirynth, The Sea Inside, Joyeaux Noel, Amelie, Ikiru, and several others.

Is Parasite undeserving of the Oscar? Absolutely not. It was cunning, captivating, poignant, thoughtful, and like all great movies, had something powerful to say about our culture. Should it have been the first foreign-language film to have earned the Best Picture honor? Probably not. It makes you wonder where the Academy has been in all years previous to Parasite, as well as what they’re going to do moving forward now that the gates are open for all foreign-language films at the Oscars?

Speaking of Parasite

Best Director: The bigger surprise isn’t even the fact that Parasite won Best Picture, which it might have been able to nab anyway since it also won Best International Feature and Best Original Screenplay (more on that later). The biggest surprise is that director Bong Joon-Ho won Best Director, beating out DGA winner Sam Mendes for 1917

Again, Bong Joon-Ho is not undeserving of this honor in the least. The way he mirrored the two worlds of the rich and the poor was stunning and captivating and showed the true genius of a brilliant director at work. But what’s so surprising is that his win supersedes Sam Mendes’ win at the DGA Awards, which have been used to predict Best Director Oscar winners for decades now. Are the DGAs slowly moving towards irrelevance in regards to the Academy? Only a few more ceremonies will confirm that for sure.

Either way, congratulations to Bong Joon-Ho and his well-deserved win. I’ll admit 1917 was my favorite to win both Best Picture and Best Director, but I can’t fault Parasite by any means. Joon-Ho made a brilliant film, and nobody can take that honor away from him.

Best Actor: The Academy was right to award Joaquin Phoenix his first Oscar in his 30-year career for playing a meek clown gone mad in Todd Phillips’ Joker. He completely earned the Oscar for giving one of the most haunting and darkly comedic performances of the decade. Congratulations to Joaquin for his well-deserved win, although his acceptance speech where he complained about the evils of milking cows was a little strange.

Best Actress: Judy Garland may have never won an Oscar, but Renee Zellweger did for portraying the actress in her dramatic biopic Judy. It still blows my mind that this home-grown Texan could portray the late actress’s final years in show business and pull it off with the conviction and appeal that made Garland a household name in the first place. Congrats to Renee for winning her second Oscar. Here’s to never forgetting an unforgettable performance.

Best Supporting Actor: Brad Pitt rightfully won his first acting Oscar for playing a quietly disturbing stunt double in Quentin Tarantino’s Once Upon A Time In Hollywood. Having recently revisited Pitt’s psychotic portrayal of a man’s splintered persona in David Fincher’s 1999 hit Fight Club, I was surprised to find out that he’s only been nominated for three acting Oscars prior to his first win, including 12 Monkeys, The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, and Moneyball. Pitt’s nominations don’t do justice to his commitment in the roles that he plays. Either way, congratulations to Pitt for his well-earned win. He taught me a lesson about never paying an uninvited visit to Cliff Booth at night.

Best Supporting Actress: As expected, Laura Dern won Best Supporting Actress for playing a sensitive yet savage divorce lawyer in Marriage Story. Having re-watched Dern and her co-star Scarlett Johannson in both Marriage Story and Jojo Rabbit, I’m still baffled as to how Dern could have the edge over Johannson, especially when you see her passioned and sensitive performances in both of the movies she’s nominated for. If you want to talk about talent that wasn’t even nominated, Jennifer Lopez gave a commanding performance as a stripper with attitude and swagger in Hustlers. Either of those women could have walked away with the Oscar and it would have made perfect sense. But Dern has a couple of scenes in her office and in the courtroom and suddenly she’s an Oscar frontrunner? Why? What did she do that was so special compared to her fellow nominees, or even her fellow co-stars?

Either way, congrats to Dern for winning Best Supporting Actress. I could think of five other movies she deserved to win the Oscar for more so than this one, but I guess the path doesn’t matter as much as the destination does.

SOURCE: Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures

Best Animated Feature: Like clockwork, Toy Story 4 won Best Animated Feature, despite the fact that How To Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World and Klaus were both better films. If the Academy keeps this up, they should save the viewers some time and simply rename this category to the Disney-Pixar award. At least then they’d be honest.

Best Documentary Feature: Okay, I got this one wrong, but to be fair this category was already a toss-up in the first place. I figured the Academy would go with a film as unique and creative as the one that followed one of Bekirlija’s last beekeepers in Honeyland. I should have known the Academy would have gone political and given the Oscar to the Obama’s first documentary produced under their new production company, American Factory. Earning an Academy Award is officially the newest thing that the former President can claim that the current President cannot.

Best International Feature: Of course since Parasite won Best Picture, Best International Feature was obviously going to be a shoo-in. I do find it odd that it technically has won two best film Oscars on one night, but either way, it isn’t undeserving. If you haven’t gotten the memo by now, you need to watch Parasite at your earliest convenience if you haven’t done so already.

Best Original Screenplay: Again, Parasite upsets in the original writing category after securing its win at the WGA’s. When I predicted Quentin Tarantino would win for Once Upon A Time In Hollywood, I did so only knowing that the Academy almost never awards writing Oscars to foreign-language films. In fact, the last time a foreign-language film even won the original writing Oscar was Spain’s Talk To Her in 2002, and after that eight other films were overlooked in this category before Parasite finally won last night. Again though, it deserves the win as Bong Joon-Ho’s writing is just as clever and captivating as his directing is for the film. I just hope Bong Joon-Ho doesn’t go too crazy with celebrating. I would like him to not die of alcohol poisoning and keep making more movies as wonderful as Parasite.

Best Adapted Screenplay: In another stunning upset, Taika Waititi wins the Adapted Screenplay Oscar for Jojo Rabbit and shuts Greta Gerwig out for Little Women. If Academy voters are smart, they’ll hide out in their bunkers and wait for rage Twitter to blow over. Little Women fans are going to be upset about this one for a while.

SOURCE: 20th Century Fox

Best Film Editing: Yet another category I got wrong. I thought Yang Jin-Mo was going to win for seamlessly assembling various perspectives into one cohesive and tragic narrative in Parasite, but I neglected how exciting and dizzying Ford v Ferrari was while simultaneously being coherent enough to follow all of the fast-paced racing action. Michael McCusker (Walk The Line, 3:10 To Yuma) is not undeserving by any means, and I’m happy he can finally call himself an Oscar-winner. At the very least, Ford v Ferrari’s best editing win makes more sense than Bohemian Rhapsody’s win did last year.

Best Cinematography: Roger Deakins rightfully earned his second Oscar for his masterful one-shot technique in Sam Mendes’ emotionally stirring war epic 1917. If any other nominee won, rioting from the cinematographer’s branch would have been the only appropriate reaction.

Best Makeup and Hairstyling: Bombshell won best makeup, as expected. Thank you, next.

Best Costume Design: I thought Once Upon A Time In Hollywood’s timely wardrobe would appeal to the Academy as it does to its colorful and charismatic characters. I figured since Jacquelin Durran already won once for Anna Karenina that the period piece play wouldn’t work as well on the Academy this time around. I should have just went with the period piece, because Little Women won as predictably as Anna Karenina did in 2012. Jenny Eagan was also not nominated for Knives Out, which means that in a way, I lost twice in this category.

Best Production Design: In a happy upside, Once Upon A Time In Hollywood won the Oscar for Best Production Design. Nancy Haigh deserves her win for accurately recreating 60’s signage and movie sets. That is, before Quentin Tarantino covered it all with blood and splattered brains.

SOURCE: WARNER BROS. PICTURES

Best Musical Score: As predicted, Hildur Guonadottir won for providing the haunting, eerie string themes for Joker’s descent into madness. I’m just frustrated Thomas Newman has to go through his 15th nomination for 1917 and still not win a blasted Oscar. But in either case, congratulations to Guonadottir for making a beautiful yet unsettling theme for the Joker’s mental and moral decay. Meanwhile, let’s hope the 16th time is a charm for Newman during a future ceremony.

Best Original Song: Elton John won his second Oscar for his uplifting and empowering theme “I’m Gonna Love Me Again” for Rocketman. Thankfully so, because I don’t know how fans might have reacted if Bohemian Rhapsody won four Oscars and Rocketman didn’t win at least one. Either way, congrats to him for his well-deserved win. He made everyone feel the love tonight.

Best Sound Editing: Ford v Ferrari beat out the rest of the nominees for Best Sound Editing. I personally made the case for 1917, but Ford v Ferrari admittedly did have some exemplary sound editing in it. I’m not as frustrated by the loss like I was last year when Bohemian Rhapsody unbelievably won this award over A Quiet Place. I doubt any nominee winning this year could top my shock any more than that win did last year.

Best Sound Mixing: If that “Wayfaring Stranger” scene in 1917 didn’t convince you that it deserved to win for sound mixing, then nothing ever will. Thankfully, Academy voters saw that scene and was as moved as I was and rightfully awarded the film with the Oscar anyway.

Best Visual Effects: What did I tell you? What did I bloody tell you? The Academy can’t support outstanding visual effects to save its dang life if it means awarding it to a superhero movie. They did just that this year by giving the best visual effects Oscar to 1917 instead of the vastly more grand-scale Avengers: Endgame. Granted, I do not feel 1917 is a better film than Endgame is, but that’s like comparing apples to oranges. After all, 1917 is a grounded war eulogy while Endgame is the epic conclusion to a superhero saga that was several years in the making. Still, recognize the better work when you see it. 1917 may be the more moving film, but you’re bonkers if you think that film compares visually to the sensation and spectacle of Avengers: Endgame. At this rate, Disney should just buy out the Academy and give themselves the visual effects Oscar every time they’re nominated just to get a fair chance in this category.

Disclaimer: I’m kidding, of course. I don’t want Disney to get even more power-hungry than it already is. But still, I hope you understand how hot-blooded I am about this snub, especially since this is hot off of the heels of Avengers: Infinity War losing to First Man in 2019.

And finally, the shorts. I don’t know what is going on with me, but I’ve been on a roll with these categories as of late. Last year, I unbelievably got all of them right as opposed to most ceremonies where I get most of them wrong. This year I’m continuing the good streak as The Neighbor’s Window, Hair Love, and Learning To Skateboard In A Warzone (If You’re A Girl) all won Best Live Action, Best Animated and Best Documentary Short respectively. That helped boost me in predicting 16 out of 24 of the categories correctly this year. Not my best Oscar performance, but definitely not my worst.

Thank you all for tuning in yet again this year, fellow Oscar lovers. Now go and see Parasite. You obviously need to.

– David Dunn

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2019 Oscar Predictions

Life is funny. At the beginning of this decade, I was screaming into a camera ranting about how the Academy Awards robbed The Dark Knight Rises by giving it precisely zero Oscar nominations. As year after year passed, the Academy kept making one senseless snub after another, from no nominations for Captain America: Civil War and Wonder Woman to not giving Sylvester Stallone his much-deserved Oscar for playing a weary Rocky Balboa in Creed (I still haven’t gotten over that, and probably never will). Last year seemed like the Academy’s first genuine attempt at branching out across all genres and recognizing mainstream films that truly deserved it, even going so far as to give Black Panther three Oscars and a Best Picture nomination. And then they end the decade by giving the most nominations to a film about Batman’s greatest nemesis, the Joker. We started the decade with no nominations for Batman, and then we end the decade with Joker earning some of the most nominations out of any film in the past 10 years.

Like I said, life is funny. And the one thing you need to remember about humor is that tragedy plus time equals comedy: and we have no shortage of tragic snubs to experience this year.

Take, for instance, Joker itself. Yes, it’s nominated the most this year with 11 nominations, including Best Picture. However, it’s not expected to sweep the night by any metric. After all, when you compare Joker side-by-side with the epic and grand scale of 1917, how do you think it compares? It isn’t even a competition: Joker is blown clean off of the German front lines.

That, however, isn’t the least of the losses we’re expected to witness throughout the night. Read on to see my predictions for how the Oscars will play out for the last time this decade:

SOURCE: Universal Pictures

Best Picture: It has become impossible to get into the minds of Academy Award voters and rationalize their loop-de-loop thinking when it comes to the Best Picture winners in the past few years. First, they award Spotlight with Best Picture over The Revenant, despite the fact that Revenant won three Oscars for directing, acting, and cinematography while Spotlight only won one for writing. Then Moonlight unexpectedly beat La La Land for Best Picture, with the infamous mixup announcement happening between the two nominees. After that, The Shape of Water frustratingly became the first science-fiction film to win Best Picture, even over the likes of Star Wars, Inception, and 2001: A Space Odyssey. Finally, the play-it-safe Green Book won over the heartfelt and personal Spanish film Roma, a controversial move that did not go unnoticed by the larger moviegoing community.

In all of Oscar history, no foreign-language film has ever won Best Picture, which is why I’m hesitant to say South Korea’s Parasite will win it now. That leaves the night’s biggest contenders to duke it out for Best Picture: 1917, Joker, Once Upon A Time In Hollywood, and The Irishman. I doubt it will be Joker since it has the unfortunate stigma of being a comic-book movie working against it. I simultaneously don’t think Martin Scorsese will win for The Irishman either since he hasn’t won an Oscar since directing The Departed in 2006. That leaves 1917 and Once Upon A Time In Hollywood, both heavy contenders for different reasons. Once Upon A Time In Hollywood is a jeering, clever, and sharp commentary on violence and media consumption, while 1917 is a mesmerizing masterpiece that immerses you in the soldier’s experience on the battlefield.

My bias may be influencing my prediction here, but I genuinely do believe 1917 will win Best Picture. For one thing, a war film has surprisingly not won Best Picture yet this decade, despite the fact that every decade has had at least one war film winning Best Picture at least once. It has also been silently sweeping up Awards season, previously winning Best Picture awards at both the Golden Globes and the Producer’s Guild.

Also, 1917 is just truly the most deserving winner out of the nominees. Few films place you so vividly in the reality of its characters as well as 1917 does with its tale of two soldiers venturing through the German front lines to stop a devastating attack. If 1917 does end up winning Best Picture, it will be very well deserved.

Best Director: Sam Mendes won the DGA Award, which means he will also win the Best Directing Oscar for 1917. Again, Mendes made a powerful, moving film made all the more impactful through its one continuous shot filming method (more on that later). Aside from his DGA win, Mendes is simply the most deserving out of all the nominees. That’s really saying something considering his competition is in The Irishman’s Martin Scorsese, Parasite’s Bong Joon-ho, Once Upon A Time In Hollywood’s Quentin Tarantino, and Joker’s Todd Phillips.

Speaking of Joker…

Best Actor: It will be a national outrage if anyone wins in this category other than Joaquin Phoenix for Joker. Not only did he deliver a visceral and haunting portrayal of a decent man gone mad and murderous, but he also gave one of the most unsettling performances this decade that challenges even Heath Ledger’s portrayal of the clown prince of crime. Leonardo DiCaprio did a great job switching between comedic and intimidating in Once Upon A Time In Hollywood and Adam Driver gave a vulnerable and affectionate performance as a heartbroken husband in Marriage Story. But no, if we’re talking about the best actor and the best performance of the year, it’s not even a competition. Joaquin for the win.

Best Actress: I loved Scarlett Johannson in Marriage Story and thought she did a wonderful job tenderly demonstrating how a family falling apart affects somebody as both a wife and mother. But the Academy has a history of awarding real-life roles moreover original ones, especially this year where Scarlett is up against three biographical performances in Bombshell, Judy, and Harriet. Who will it go to? My money is on Renee Zellweger considering how she completely disappears into her portrayal of Judy Garland in Judy. Sure, she’s won an Oscar before for Best Supporting Actress in 2003’s Cold Mountain, but considering she’s been out of the spotlight for a hot second, this seems like the perfect opportunity to recognize some of her under-the-radar work. Charlize Theron or Scarlett might pull an upset in this category, but it isn’t likely given Zellweger’s tenure.

Best Supporting Actor: There are several reasons to consider Brad Pitt winning Best Supporting Actor in his pointed and indomitable performance as a stuntman filled with swagger and violent tendencies in Once Upon A Time In Hollywood. One such reason is that Pitt has never won an acting Oscar before and all of his competitors have. Another reason is that he already won the corresponding SAG award a week after he was nominated. But my reasoning is simple, straightforward, and to the point: his performance is just too freggin’ good to ignore. In a long line of memorable Quentin Tarantino performances from John Travolta in Pulp Fiction to Christoph Waltz in Inglorious Basterds, Pitt’s is the most restrained and unnerving. Brad Pitt absolutely owned his role, and he deserves no less than the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for it.

Best Supporting Actress: First of all, shame on the Academy for not nominating Jennifer Lopez as a hardworking stripper with attitude in Hustlers. Her commanding presence dominated that entire film, and it’s ridiculous she wasn’t even recognized with a simple nomination. It’s even more maddening when you realize no Latina actresses were nominated in any of the acting categories this year, not even Penelope Cruz in Pain and Glory or Ana de Armas in Knives Out. Absolutely outrageous, but that’s regressive Hollywood at work here people.

As for the rest of the supporting actress nominees, my personal favorite is Scarlett Johansson in Jojo Rabbit as a German mother trying to keep her son playful and happy in a world rotting from death, misery, and antisemitism. But she’s picked up no traction this awards season, and it’s unlikely that she’ll pick up the pace in the next few weeks. No, Laura Dern is much more likely to win as a compassionate and charismatic divorce attorney in Marriage Story, which is weird because A) She’s in the film very little, and B) She doesn’t have a lot of space to really make an impact as a character. Or at least, not as much as her co-stars Adam Driver and Scarlett Johannson do. It would be like Ray Liotta winning Best Supporting Actor as Adam Driver’s attorney, even though he was in the film very little and did even less.

Still, she was good in the role she played and fulfilled the part that she needed to. I’ll be happy if I get this category wrong, but for now, I’m going with Laura.

SOURCE: Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures

Best Animated Feature: If we’re going off of merit, the clear winner in this category deserves to be How To Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World. It was deep, affecting, incredibly moving, and featured the same beautiful and fast-paced animation you’ve seen from this whole franchise. I doubt it will win, however. The previous two movies lost to Pixar and Disney respectively both times, the first time with Toy Story 3 and the second time with Big Hero 6. I expect this year’s ceremony to repeat that trend with Toy Story 4 winning the Oscar for Best Animated Feature. It’s a shame, especially since How To Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World was so committed to its ending whereas Toy Story 4 didn’t even commit itself to the toys’ original ending. But whatever. There are worse snubs that will pop up throughout the night.

Best Documentary Feature: Best Documentary has always been a difficult category to predict, especially when you haven’t even seen half of the nominees like I have. However, there’s one film that is a slight outlier to the rest of the nominees, and that is Honeyland. Not only does this Macedonian documentary focus on a lonely beekeeper keeping the craft alive in the mountainous region of Bekirlija, but Honeyland is also nominated for the Best International Feature. To put that into context, no film has ever been nominated for both Best Documentary and Best Foreign Language Film at the Oscars, so that has to carry some significance to it. Again, no assurances on this category, but if I have to place my bet on one of these nominees, I’m going with Honeyland

Best International Feature: Parasite. If anything else wins, the Dolby Theatre deserves to be burnt to the ground.

Best Original Screenplay: If there was any fairness in the Academy Awards’ voting process, they would just hand Rian Johnson his Oscar for Knives Out and call it a day. Unfortunately, he’s up against four other Best Picture nominees in the Best Original Screenplay category, so he doesn’t stand a snowball’s chance. Ridiculous that one of the most creative, cunning, and crafty films of the year gets diluted to a mere honorable mention. But that’s the Oscars for you. At least Knives Out got nominated for something, which is more than can be said about Us or Uncut Gems.

That remains the dilemma of who will win the Oscar for Best Original Screenplay? I doubt it will be 1917 since that film’s aesthetic and technique is more impressive than its actual writing is. I also doubt it will be Parasite since three other foreign-language films have been nominated this decade and all of them lost, though I am pleased the Academy nominated Bong Joon-ho and Han Jin-won in this category regardless.

That leaves Quentin Tarantino for Once Upon A Time In Hollywood and Noah Baumbach for Marriage Story. Who will win? Tarantino has won this award twice already, once for Pulp Fiction in 1994 and another for Django Unchained in 2012. Three-peats are not common for Best Original Screenplay, but if anyone can do it, I guess it’s Tarantino.

At the same time, Noah Baumbach made a deeply affecting and personal homily with Marriage Story that was equal parts heartbreaking and hopeful. He has conversely never won an Oscar, though he was nominated once for The Squid and the Whale in 2005. Plus, the Academy has awarded more tender and heartfelt screenplays as of late than they have for witty and wild ones, with Manchester By The Sea winning in 2017 and Green Book winning last year.

This category is a coin toss, but if I’m going with my instincts, I’m going to guess Tarantino wins his third Oscar for Once Upon A Time In Hollywood. Don’t be surprised if Baumbach pulls an upset, however.

Best Adapted Screenplay: If Issa Rae’s “congratulations to all these men” remark tells you anything, it’s that the female filmmaking community really did not appreciate that Little Women director Greta Gerwig was not given a Best Director nomination. The Academy will make it up to her by giving her the Best Adapted Screenplay Oscar for Little Women now. I don’t want to even think about the wrath the Academy might face if they snub Greta Gerwig twice in the same ceremony.

SOURCE: CJ Entertainment

Best Film Editing: This category in particular is difficult to predict nowadays, mostly because you don’t know whether the Academy is going to give the Oscar to a nominee that truly deserves it like The Social Network or Whiplash, or if they’re going to give it to something completely bonkers like Bohemian Rhapsody. In the end, I find myself completely absorbed and mesmerized by Yang Jin-mo’s brilliant assembly of beauty and chaos in Parasite and cannot imagine any other film winning for Best Film Editing. It’s possible one of the flashier films like The Irishman and Ford v Ferrari might pull off a win, especially since Bohemian Rhapsody was last year’s underdog and it unbelievably beat both Vice and BlackKklansman. In unpredictable times like these, it’s best to go with the best nominee as opposed to the best prospects. So Parasite it is.

Best Cinematography: It would not have been possible to have made the film Sam Mendes did if it weren’t for Roger Deakins’ skilled and masterful cinematography for 1917. The way he fully captured the desperation and tragedies of war was captivating and heartbreaking, and it makes it even more impressive that he filmed it to look like one continuous shot. In many ways, 1917 is just as much Deakins’ film as it is Mendes’, and no other nominee deserves the Oscar as much as he does. If anyone else wins, it will be the 13th time the Academy has snubbed Deakins.

Best Makeup and Hairstyling: The first time I caught a glimpse at Charlize Theron in Bombshell, I seriously mistook her for Megyn Kelly. A lot of the makeup work done for the film is that exemplary, with characters appearing so starkly similar to their real-life counterparts that you could put them right on Fox News and you almost wouldn’t be able to tell the difference. The makeup work on Joker and Maleficent is equally stunning, but if we’re going to go with the most skillful makeup job here, my money is on Bombshell.

Also, praise to the Academy for nominating five nominees in the makeup category this year as opposed to the usual three. Makeup artists are often the most overlooked professionals in Hollywood, and I’m glad they’re getting the exposure they deserve here. Hopefully, this is a trend the Academy will keep up for future ceremonies.

Best Costume Design: The Oscar winner for Best Costume Design is particularly difficult to predict this year, mostly because all of the nominees are so outstanding. Previous Academy Award winners Sandy Powell, Jacqueline Durran, and Mark Bridges are respectively nominated for The Irishman, Little Women, and Joker, while Mayes C. Rubeo and Arienne Phillips are also nominated for JoJo Rabbit and Once Upon A Time In Hollywood. While JoJo Rabbit’s costumes were packed with as much personality and uniqueness as its wildly entertaining characters were, Once Upon A Time In Hollywood deserves special praise for doing the same thing while simultaneously calling back to the wardrobe of 1960s pop culture. I love all of these costumes equally, but if I’m going with the most likely winner, I’m going to have to guess it’s Once Upon A Time In Hollywood. 

Side note: Shame on the Academy for not honoring Jenny Eagan’s beautiful and mesmerizing work on the mystery-thriller Knives Out. The costumes on the film’s suspects were so colorful and alive that they echoed back to the mini figurines from “Clue.”

Best Production Design: Another difficult category to predict, especially with two clear frontrunners going head-to-head: 1917 and Once Upon A Time In Hollywood. Fun fact: the Academy Award winners for 1991’s Bugsy are also nominated here against each other – Dennis Glasner for 1917 and Nancy Haigh for Once Upon A Time In Hollywood. Man, if that isn’t an entertaining coincidence, I don’t know what is.

Anyhow, predictions. Many of the sets for 1917 were created from scratch in order to accommodate the one continuous shot filming method. This is especially impressive in scenes involving the claustrophobic trenches or the muddy No Man’s Land, given the harrowing detail in the damage and casualties surrounding the British soldiers. However, there is one flaw not necessarily with the production design itself, but rather the capturing of it. In especially dark scenes where they’re filming in the thick of night or deep in a tunnel, it’s impossible to observe the set design through all of the shadows. The sets in these sequences very well could be amazing or terrible. We will never know because of how opaque these sequences were.

Once Upon A Time In Hollywood, however, didn’t have a dark moment in it (well, in terms of the lighting, that is). Since that is the case, we’re able to absorb its full production design in detail, and man is it gorgeous. Whether Sharon Tate is walking up to an oldie theater to watch The Wrecking Crew, Rick is acting on-set of a spaghetti western, or Cliff is eerily investigating Spahn Ranch, all of the sets in Once Upon A Time In Hollywood were colorful, vibrant, and ripe with 1960s life. It’s a close call, but Once Upon A Time In Hollywood has a slight edge for being represented more on-screen and meeting the challenge. Sorry, Dennis. At least 1917 isn’t going home empty-handed in the other categories.

Another side note: Again, the Academy was wrong to snub David Crank and Jeremy Woodward’s phenomenal craft in assembling Harlan Thrombey’s ancient, isolated mansion in Knives Out. If the first 10 minutes alone wasn’t convincing enough of their hard work and deserving of being nominated, then certainly the other two hours were. Their absence was absurd and ridiculous to the highest degree, and Jacob would be rage-tweeting about it online if he found out his grandfather’s mansion wasn’t nominated for an Oscar either.

SOURCE: WARNER BROS. PICTURES

Best Musical Score: Do you know who I feel really bad for? Thomas Newman. Not only has he been nominated a whopping 13 times by the Academy, but he has also never won an Oscar for Best Musical Score. Not once. Not with The Shawshank Redemption. Not with American Beauty. Not with Finding Nemo, WALL-E, Skyfall, Saving Mr. Banks, or Bridge of Spies. The only other nominee who’s been snubbed the number of times Thomas Newman has been was cinematographer Roger Deakins, who was also nominated 13 times for Best Cinematography before he finally won for Blade Runner 2049.

This year, unfortunately, is no different for him. He’s facing stiff competition with the likes of Alexandre Desplat for Little Women and John Williams for Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker. Most of his nominees, however, have already won Oscars. Thomas Newman is one of the few composers to have not won yet, along with Icelandic newcomer Hildur Guonadottir for Joker.

Since this is the case, the underdog brawl comes down to Newman for 1917 and Guonadottir for Joker – and Quonadottir has a slight edge, only because Joker won the Golden Globe for Best Original Score while 1917 didn’t. This is the only category where I really hope I’m wrong, however, as Newman is an outstanding composer and deserves to be recognized at least once in his 35-year career, especially for the hauntingly gorgeous themes he provided in the backdrop of 1917.

Please, Academy. If you have any sense or decency, give Newman his much-deserved Oscar already. Otherwise, you’ll look like the jokers Hollywood already believes you are.

Best Original Song: Elton John fans are already ticked off that last year’s Bohemian Rhapsody won four Oscars, whereas Rocketman only got one nomination this year for Best Original Song. If “I’m Gonna Love Me Again” doesn’t win the Oscar now, then it will break Rocketman fans’ hearts. Don’t let the sun go down on them, Academy.

Best Sound Editing: 1917. I know its commonplace to give this award to war pictures, but 1917 stands out even when compared to fellow winners Dunkirk and American Sniper. I don’t usually care much about the sound categories, but 1917’s sound editing truly deserves to be recognized. If not it, then Ford v Ferrari. 

Best Sound Mixing: 1917. Again, compared to recent winners Dunkirk and Hacksaw Ridge, 1917 is truly masterful in its sound engineering. There are scenes where a loud, ear-piercing BANG will go off from the screen and it just sends shivers down your spine. Other times, the soft and quiet sounds of a soldier singing “Wayfaring Stranger” crescendoes into a beautiful melody that captures your heart and your emotions. Again, its possible Ford v Ferrari might pull an upset, but 1917 is the current leader in this category for very good reason.

Best Visual Effects: A lot of people believe Avengers: Endgame is the clear leader in this category. No. Not this time. Last year’s Avengers: Infinity War clearly deserved to be the winner, but the Academy chose to give the visual effects Oscar to the shoddy, dull, and vastly unimpressive First Man instead. Does Endgame deserve to win against the likes of its fellow nominees Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker, The Irishman, and The Lion King? Obviously, but it won’t win because of the Academy’s preconceived bias. So screw the Academy. Avengers: Endgame won’t win the Oscar for best visual effects, even though it clearly deserves to.

That being said, 1917 was stunning in how it placed you on the German front lines in World War I, especially in conjunction with Deakins’ one-shot filming technique. I still don’t know how the film fully encapsulated the epic-scale war violence and tragedy that it did. 1917 may not be my first pick for best visual effects, but it’s definitely a solid second, and I think it’s going to end up winning. If Avengers: Endgame ends up winning in its place, Thanos needs to come back and snap the Academy members off of the voting board.

And finally, the dreaded short categories, which I never watch and am yet condemned to predict anyway. I usually go with the most interesting titles for these categories, so with that criteria in mind, I’m gonna guess that The Neighbor’s Window, Hair Love, and Learning To Skateboard In A Warzone (If You’re A Girl) wins Best Live Action, Best Animated and Best Documentary Short respectively. I unbelievably got all three of these categories right last year, so let’s see if the good man Oscar looks down favorably upon my ballot again this year.

And those are my predictions, folks. Tune in on Feb. 9 to see how well I did on my ballot this year, as well as vent my frustrations at how Knives Out was unbelievably not nominated for anything this year except for Best Original Screenplay – which it should have won, by the way.

– David Dunn

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Why So Snubby?

SOURCE: WARNER BROS. PICTURES

Another year, another Oscars ceremony without a host. This is a year of many firsts for the Academy Awards. For one thing, this is the first year in quite a while where they’ll be hosting the ceremony in early February as opposed to late February/early March, so they’ll essentially be airing it in back-to-back weekends between the DGA’s and the WGA’s. This is also the first consecutive year to conduct the ceremony hostless, a trend they’ll be keeping up from the previous year when Kevin Hart was dropped from the show. And perhaps most surprisingly, this is the first year where the film to get the most nominations is not a period piece or a biopic, but a comic-book film.

Yes, dear reader: the critically-lauded Joker received not one, not 10, but 11 Oscar nominations, including Best Picture. Since the Academy has an especially sordid history with snubbing one comic-book film after another (with the likes of The Dark Knight, The Avengers, Captain America: Civil War, Logan, and many more), I’m surprised they recognized Joker with so many nominations. Granted, none of them are undeserving. Joaquin Phoenix has certainly earned his Best Actor nomination, as did Todd Phillips for his Best Director nomination. Besides those nominations, Joker is also nominated for Adapted Screenplay, Original Score, Cinematography, Film Editing, Makeup and Hairstyling, Costume Design, Sound Editing, and Mixing.

Following up Joker with 10 nominations is the Sam Mendes WWI drama 1917, the Martin Scorsese gangster epic The Irishman, and the hotshot Quentin Tarantino love letter to 60s cinema Once Upon A Time In Hollywood. Again, none of these Best Picture nominees are surprising in the least. The Academy laps up Martin Scorsese just about as many times as they do Meryl Streep, and war pictures have a great track record with getting nominated by the Academy as well. Pay attention to 1917 and The Irishman in the technical categories especially. They stand a really good chance at snagging a few of those awards.

The biggest surprise out of those three films was how many nominations Once Upon A Time In Hollywood racked up. With 10 nominations, Once Upon A Time In Hollywood is officially Tarantino’s most nominated film, right after Inglorious Basterds with eight nominations. Not that it wasn’t deserving. Leonardo DiCaprio and Brad Pitt alike were both spitfires in the movie, and Tarantino was arguably at his best behind both the script and the director’s chair. But sweeping the technical nominations was especially unexpected. A few of them, such as cinematography and costume design, were a given. But sound editing, mixing, and production design? That came from left field out of nowhere.

Next up with six nominations apiece is the WWII satire film Jojo Rabbit, the coming-of-age drama Little Women, the heartbreaking divorce homily Marriage Story, and the eerie yet entertaining Parasite. Parasite is certain to have the newly-named International Feature Film award on lockdown, and director Bong Joon-Ho is an early favorite in the directing category as well. Little Women was a little unexpected for best leading and supporting actress, adapted screenplay, costume design and original score, but since no female directors are nominated for Best Director this year, it’s kind of necessary to give this much love to a female empowerment film. Marriage Story, meanwhile, swept in most of the acting categories, with Scarlett Johannson even being nominated twice for both Marriage Story and Jojo Rabbit. Do any of these films stand a chance against the heavyweight titans of Joker, 1917, Once Upon A Time In Hollywood, and The Irishman? We can only wait until Oscar night to find out.

And the last, but certainly not least, Best Picture nominee is the racing drama Ford v Ferrari, which is also nominated in the sound and film editing categories. The most shocking thing about this nominee isn’t that it only has four nominations (against everything else, that’s more or less to be expected). What’s shocking is that Christian Bale, who gave a stellar performance as Ken Miles, isn’t nominated for Best Actor. And to be fair to the other nominees, I haven’t seen Antonio Banderas in Pain and Glory or Jonathan Pryce in The Two Popes. But they don’t stand a snowballs chance against their peers, so you have to wonder why Bale wasn’t even being considered over them?

SOURCE: Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences

Speaking of snubs, this year has no shortage of them just like with any other given year. The biggest snub Disney fans will notice is that Frozen 2 isn’t nominated for Best Animated Feature, although it is still nominated for Best Original Song with “Into The Unknown.” Jordan Peele’s thoughtful and observant horror film Us was given a resounding zero nominations, not even for Lupita Nyong’o for her hypnotizing dual performance as a petrified mother and her murderous doppelganger. Perhaps most shockingly, Uncut Gems was nominated for a big, fat “nothing” for this year’s ceremony, not even a Best Actor nomination for Adam Sandler’s mesmerizingly brazen performance. Thanks a lot, Academy. We’re going to get Grown Ups 3 now because of you.

But the most maddening has to be the absence of Rian Johnson’s masterful murder-mystery Knives Out, a movie that challenges us socially and politically as much as it does narratively and thematically. Knives Out was brilliant in just about every which way it could be, from the performances and the cinematography to the music and the editing. Even the bloody costumes and set designs were among the most colorful and stylish production jobs of the year. But nope, no nominations for those categories either. I get that five nominations limit what you can include in these categories and where. Still, I would have been fine to knock down a few nominations from Joker if it meant a few more nominations for Knives Out. At least Rian Johnson was nominated for Best Original Screenplay, so he can now call himself an Academy Award nominee at the very least.

Overall, this is a decent year for the Oscars. I’m glad to see comic-book movies like Joker get a little more love this time around, even if it is arguably a little too much love. Regardless, we have a lot to look forward to and many more surprises and snubs coming our way. Get ready, folks. At least there won’t be a host on February 9.

– David Dunn

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Top 10 Films Of 2019

“Is it just me, or is it getting crazier out there?”

– Arthur Fleck, Joker

It’s not just you, Arthur. By nearly every definition, 2019 sucked, and it looks like 2020 is only going to get worse. Not only has the usual political discourse ruined relationships and family reunions (with ongoing arguments intensifying relating to healthcare, taxes, civil rights, and whether an immigrant can be considered a person), but with the 2020 elections ramping up, more idiots from both sides of the aisle are shouting at each other louder than ever (especially the President himself). By nearly every metric, 2019 has been one long, pulsating, cancer-sized headache, and 2020 is only going to grow into an even bigger one.

Normally this is where the optimist in me would pipe in and say “But at least we have the movies!” Nope. Not this year. In a year full of crappy sequels, prequels, reboots, and remakes nobody asked for, most of the legitimately great movies came out at the tail end of the year between late November and December. Of course, this is not a new trend in Hollywood: studios like to release high-profile releases late in the year so they can get more consideration closer to awards season. Still, this year seems particularly worse even by Hollywood’s already desperate standards. On Christmas week, eight high-profile releases (count them: EIGHT) were released all at once, including Richard Jewell, Bombshell, Uncut Gems, A Hidden Life, Little Women, 1917, Just Mercy, and Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker. Good lord, is that enough movies for one week? I’m lucky I caught even a handful of them before the year ended. To be honest, part of me just wanted to say to hell with it and just go with my original top 10 and forget the rest. But that wouldn’t be responsible film journalism, so I powered through and fit in as many screenings as I could before January 1 rolled around. Yay me.

As with any other year, these are my 10 favorite films that came out in 2019. A few disclaimers here. One: my list equals my opinion. There are going to be several films that many cinephiles will feel belongs on this list and will wonder why they aren’t on here. There are two possibilities: either I didn’t see the film in question, or it just wasn’t good enough to make my top 10. I know some of you probably loved Harriet and The Lighthouse, but I saw both of those movies on the same night and disliked both of them equally. Sorry to disappoint.

Also, as evident in my earlier rant, I have not seen every film released this year, despite how much I tried to do so. Probably the biggest releases that slipped past my radar this year includes 1917 and Rocketman, but what can I say? Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker came out, and I have priorities.

So without further adieu, let’s wrap up the year – and for that matter, the decade – with my top 10 favorite films of 2019, starting with…

10. Uncut Gems

SOURCE: A24

A tense, anxious, and heart-racing crime thriller that keeps building on the pressure and never lets up. Adam Sandler gives an unexpected breakout performance as Howard Ratner, a desperate Diamond District jeweler who’s neck-deep in debt to several dangerous loan sharks. Sandler does a brilliant job in completely immersing himself in this self-absorbed and egocentric character, a man consumed by his own greed and selfish desires. This is a man who starts the movie in a hole six feet deep, digs himself out of it a little bit, then digs himself like 15 feet deeper. Writers and directors Josh and Benny Safdie do a mesmerizing job showing this man’s life spiraling out of control. Just when you get a moment to breathe for even a second, the film escalates to even further stress and insanity. A little too quick-paced for some viewers, but Uncut Gems is a taut masterwork to behold. Sandler better get nominated for an Oscar next year. He’s earned it. Three and a half stars.

9. Shazam!

SOURCE: Warner Bros. Pictures

A dazzling and spectacular action movie that fulfills the inner child fantasy of being a superhero. When 12-year-old orphan Billy Batson (Asher Angel) comes into contact with an ancient wizard (Djimon Hounsou) that bestows him with supernatural abilities, Billy becomes a powerful superhero named Shazam (Zachary Levi) and is told to use his newfound powers for good – or at least, however much good a 12-year-old is capable of inside a 30-year-old’s body. Asher Angel and Zachary Levi do wonderful jobs in playing the different sides of Billy Batson, with Asher portraying the rebellious and mischievous little pre-teen and Zachary playing the grown-up man-child that just smiles and has fun with every new superpower he discovers. Director David F. Sandberg (Lights Out, Annabelle: Creation) tells a unique, emotional, and hilarious coming of age story in this out-of-body superhero experience. Shazam! is a fresh, bold, and surprising lightning-in-a-bottle superhero epic that’s akin to the unexpected success behind the Guardians of the Galaxy movies. Three and a half stars.

8. Parasite

SOURCE: CJ Entertainment

In many ways, Parasite is like a caterpillar: it starts off looking like one thing, but then it slowly evolves until it changes into something completely different. When an impoverished family begins to infiltrate a rich family’s life, they soon realize that this family isn’t everything they appear to be, and they discover hidden secrets that they would much rather have stayed buried. Writer-director Boon Jong-Ho (Snowpiercer, Okja) illustrates this unusual and elusive tale with mystery and deceit, constantly questioning each family’s motives and flipping between who you should feel sympathy towards and why. The cast is skilled and meticulous in their mannerisms and changes in behavior, with Song Kang-ho and Choi Woo-shik being the most memorable as the poor family’s father and son. Parasite is an unexpected, unpredictable master analysis on classism and economic structure, and it constantly keeps you guessing until the film delivers its jaw-dropping conclusion. Parasite makes you question who the real villains are by the time the end credits roll. Three and a half stars.

7. Ford v Ferrari

SOURCE: 20th Century FoxA David-and-Goliath-sized underdog tale that tells the rivalry of not two massive automobile tycoons, but rather creators versus corporations. When Henry Ford II (Tracy Letts) decides he’s going to unseat Ferrari as the Le Mans Grand Prix champions, he recruits automotive designer Carroll Shelby (Matt Damon) and hot-headed racer Ken Miles (Christian Bale) to build the fastest racecar in existence. The cast is exceptional, with Christian Bale in particular outshining the rest of his talented cast with his hotshot attitude and constant need to go against the grain. Director James Mangold (3:10 To Yuma, Logan) tells this story like an industrial western, with the tension and anticipation building up like a lone cowboy stepping out of the saloon to duel with the outlaw. The racing scenes are among the most exciting ever put on film and places you in the driver’s seat as the rubber tires burn against the pavement. Ford v Ferrari is an excellent film: dramatic, moving, and dripping with enthusiasm, like oil gushing from an exhaust pipe. Four stars.

6. Marriage Story

SOURCE: NetflixA tender, heartfelt, and raw picture that shows the devastation that comes from divorce and the healing that comes after it. Scarlett Johansson and Adam Driver star as Nicole and Charlie Barber, a theater couple who slowly come to the realization that their marriage is falling apart. Sharing custody of their only child, Henry (Azhy Robertson), the duo must work to divorce respectfully so they can remain friends while continuing to raise their son. Writer-director Noah Baumbach (The Squid And The Whale, Frances Ha) illustrates an intimate and heartbreaking narrative that never feels melodramatic or out of step, but instead genuine and vulnerable in a way that only couples can truly empathize with. Scarlett Johannson and Adam Driver give vivid, grounded, and provocative performances that treats its subject matter seriously while not placing all the blame on either one parent or the other. Marriage Story is not a happy film by any means, but it is a real one and it shows that there is hope after people’s lives fall apart. Four stars.

5. Joker

SOURCE: Warner Bros. PicturesA captivating tragedy-turned-comedy that shows one of comic book’s greatest villains’ descent into madness. Joaquin Phoenix plays Arthur Fleck, a clown, aspiring comedian, and son to a loving mother who falls from grace and becomes Gotham’s infamous clown prince of crime, the Joker. Director Todd Phillips (The Hangover trilogy) tells a haunting origin story that doesn’t play so much like a comic book flick as it does a psychological breakdown, not unlike Martin Scorsese’s Taxi Driver, The King Of Comedy, or Shutter Island. Joaquin Phoenix plays both sides of Arthur Fleck and the Joker in a beautiful and mesmerizing fashion, playing a meek and cowardly fellow in one beat and then a deranged and psychotic killer clown in another. Joker is not so much a Batman prequel as it is a social observation on humanity’s flaws and how they whittle away at our moral integrity and sense of self. The fact that it just happens to feature a comic book character is just the icing on the cake. Four stars.

4. Once Upon A Time In Hollywood

SOURCE: Sony PicturesA movie that feels equally as crazy and side-wined as Quentin Tarantino’s life has been, but in many ways, also serves as a personal and heartfelt homage to the movies. Leonardo DiCaprio and Brad Pitt play a big-time TV star and his stunt double in the dog-eat-dog world of 1960’s Hollywood as they look for work in this devilishly wacky and zany dark comedy. Tarantino’s trademark violence surprisingly takes a backseat to the rest of the film’s wit and charm, all while Tarantino packs twice as much satire and self-awareness as he possibly can in the pages of his screenplay. DiCaprio and Pitt are equally exemplary in this film, with DiCaprio being the ecstatic and self-absorbed Hollywood has-been and Pitt being the sly, slick, Cool Hand Luke-type of character. Oh, and Charles Manson and his murderous cult are involved in this movie as well. If movies, murder, and the Manson family tied into one storyline doesn’t describe a Quentin Tarantino movie, then nothing ever will. Four stars.

3. Us

SOURCE: Universal Pictures

A brilliant, haunting, and harrowing horror experience that says a lot about the current state of our political culture while at the same time not playing specifically to either side of the fence. When Adelaide Wilson (Lupita Nyong’o) and her family go out to their Lake House in Santa Cruz for a fun family vacation, they suddenly find themselves haunted by their twisted doppelgangers later that night. Now on the run from their literal selves, Adelaide and her family need to survive and discover where their Tethered counterparts came from. Lupita and her on-screen family do a phenomenal job in portraying the duality of their mirrored families. Even her on-screen children, Shahadi Joseph and Evan Alex, are mesmerizing in portraying their fearful selves in one beat and their psychotic and violent alter-egos in another. This dizzying and creative premise comes from Get Out writer-director Jordan Peele, who uses this idea to tell a socially relevant story about political partisanship and socioeconomic divide. Us is a thought-provoking, contemplative cinematic experiment that makes you think for hours on end about what monsters you might have created without even realizing it. Four stars.

2. Avengers: Endgame

SOURCE: Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures

It’s hard to maintain excitement for a colossal 22-movie saga over the course of 11 years, not to mention build up to an emotional payoff that no franchise has aspired to before. Yet Avengers: Endgame knocks it out of the park in every way imaginable and more. After Thanos (Josh Brolin) wipes out half of all life in the universe in Avengers: Infinity War, the remaining Avengers have to team up to undo Thanos’ actions and save everything they hold dear. The beginning of Avengers: Endgame is very mournful and reflective as it stays on the Avengers’ failure and how much it has cost them: as somber as a funeral and twice as quiet. It isn’t until the third act where the movie explodes into the pure comic-book fun and madness that you’ve become accustomed to throughout the franchise, and it left me feeling fulfilled to every bone in my body and then some. To say Avengers: Endgame meets our gargantuan expectations is a severe understatement. It is nothing short of a cinematic epic not unlike Ben-Hur or The Lord of the Rings – one that we definitely won’t forget anytime soon. Four stars.

1. Knives Out

SOURCE: Lionsgate

I didn’t know a movie could be this creative, this captivating, this intelligent, clever, crafty, ingenious, deceptive, cunning, surprising, emotional, poignant, and socially relevant in 2019. Daniel Craig plays Benoit Blanc, a Kentuckian detective trying to solve the suspected murder of famed mystery writer William Thrombey (Christopher Plummer). Writer-director Rian Johnson (Looper, Star Wars: The Last Jedi) manages an all-star cast that is just as funny as they are infuriating, with Chris Evans, Jamie Lee Curtis, Ana De Armas, and many more offering stellar and memorable performances. Johnson puts his characters through one puzzling scenario after another and giggles mischievously as he manipulates his audience’s unsuspecting emotions, like how a maestro conducts his orchestra or how a puppeteer commands their puppets. Knives Out is a movie that’s best seen knowing as little as possible about it, because it flips the script so many times that it becomes dizzying by the time you arrive at the film’s head-spinning conclusion. Enough praise could not be said about this film and Rian Johnson’s masterful handling of it. It is nothing short of a masterpiece and my pick for the best film of 2019. Four stars.

And finally, this year’s special prize. Every year, I recognize one limited release film that did not get as much attention as many wide releases did, yet achieved more emotionally despite its smaller viewership. This year’s special prize goes to a movie that is as controversial as it is conversational, as charming as it is challenging, and as irreverent as it is important. That film is…

Special Prize: Jojo Rabbit

SOURCE: Fox Searchlight Pictures

For the life of me, I cannot understand why Jojo Rabbit bombed so precariously at the box office. Sure, it tells a relatively uncomfortable story about fascism and Nazi Germany. Sure, the movie centers around a 10-year-old boy in a day and age where child actors aren’t really that reliable. And yes, the movie does feature a 44-year-old New Zealander playing a child’s fanciful version of history’s most hated human being, Adolf Hitler. Yet, there is so much more to this movie than its mere appearances. Writer-director Taika Waititi deconstructs humanity’s most hateful period in a tone that is equally as jeering as it is joyful, like when Mel Brooks hilariously mocked racism in 1974’s Blazing Saddles. He’s also surprisingly brilliant as Jojo’s imagining of Adolf Hitler, playing a fun, cartoonish parody of the tyrant in one moment, and the more egotistical and maniacal variation of him in another. But even more impressive is the 12-year-old Roman Griffin Davis as the titular Jojo, having to witness the horrors of the holocaust through the innocent eyes of a child. For many, Jojo Rabbit will be mistaken as making light of Nazism and the hateful legacy that it inspired. Those viewers will have misinterpreted Jojo Rabbit and its genius. It’s a story of humanity, it’s a story of hope, and it shows that there is the potential for good in every human being – including a 10-year-old Nazi named Jojo. Four stars.

And that’s all of got for 2019, folks! Really, for the decade. As always, thanks for sticking with me through thick and thin. Whether you’re a consistent follower or a more casual reader, I appreciate all of you for reading my reviews and tuning in to hear my opinions about ongoing film and pop culture topics. From the bottom of my heart, thank you.

I’ll see you at the movies, in 2020, and beyond.

– David Dunn

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A Ducky Schwartz

It’s funny how fast and how hard life can come at you sometimes. A month ago, my parents and I were planning for when my Poppy and Grandy would fly over to visit us. That same weekend, my Grandy was admitted into the hospital. She died three days later from respiratory failure.

Joan Therese “Ducky” Dolinar was born June 25, 1936, in Chicago, IL to her parents John and Evelyn Cepek. She had three siblings: her brothers Phil and Jack and her sister Jeanette. She also had four of her own children, one of which was my mother. But even with a large family, she always had room to fit someone else into her inner circle. Whenever she met somebody new, she never hesitated to strike up a conversation and listen to other people’s stories. If she knew you long enough, she would bake you some kolaches or jelly cookies, maybe even sew a quilt or a blanket for you. Everybody was family to Grandy.

I can’t recall my earliest memory of her. They all blur together like a flurry of wonderful emotions rather than a series of sequential events. One of the earliest memories I remember was when I played on her Super Nintendo when I was a kid (yes, she was that cool of a grandma). I was playing the SNES version of Pinocchio when I ran into a flock of geese and they beat me up into a cloud of smoke. I couldn’t stop laughing at it, and I purposefully kept running back into the flock over and over again. Grandy would keep getting flustered at me for purposefully losing the game, and her frustration just made me laugh harder each time. I remember her throwing her hands up in the air, exhaling a deep sigh, and remarking to my mother “I don’t know what on Earth that boy is doing.”

That wasn’t my only memory of her. I would often play in her basement with her toys, most often with “Sesame Street” characters such as Burt, Ernie, Elmo, Big Bird, and Cookie Monster. I would also watch old cartoons down there as well, anything ranging between “Spongebob” and “Ed, Edd n Eddy.” She had a sewing machine down there that she would often use while I was playing, sewing another beautiful quilt, blanket, pillow, or anything else she felt like making. I didn’t realize this back then, but I felt like she would go down there to watch over me while she was quilting.

“Grandy” was by no means the only name I called her. Whenever I was five years old, we started watching those old Land Before Time movies that told the story of Littlefoot and his dinosaur friends. One character named Ducky had a huge affinity for a pterodactyl named Petrie and would often say his name in a joyful, high-pitched squeal. Grandy would mimic the same speech and giggle gleefully afterward. Eventually, we nicknamed her “Ducky” because of her cute imitation of the giddy character. We would often buy her joke gifts sans her nickname, such as plush ducks that quaked when you squeezed it and duck-themed gift cards. Ducky sometimes seemed mildly annoyed by it, but she eventually embraced the name as playfully as we did.

The rest of my time with her growing up went by in a flash. I remember small snippets of memories, like whenever we would play an old game called “Chicken Legs” where we had to match numbers together on domino tiles. I remembered when we traveled out to Lake Geneva in Wisconsin and spent a week in the condo during the summer and would swim, play on the boat, and eat delicious BBQ together. I remember when we would go out for ice cream and she would have to wipe my chin off, calling me a “messy boy.” I also remembered whenever we would watch classic movies together like Winnie the Pooh, Micky Mouse, Spider-Man, Star Wars, and several others while she sat on her couch, quietly and contentedly needling or reading.

One of my favorite memories of her was when we would play Farkel together. It was a game where you rolled six dice and tried to get patterns from ones, fives and three of a kind. Three sixes would get the most points, so we would often compete to see who would get the most sixes. Grandy would always plead with the dice to get her “her sixes,” and more often than not I would roll them before she would. She would often spread her arms out and lay her head down across the table, crying out “Noooo, my sixes! How could you do this to me???” Our games would often end up with one of us rolling on our seat in laughter.

One of the things I think I looked past in my childhood was how masterful Ducky Schwartz was in her sewing craft. I always knew she was a skilled seamstress. If any of my favorite shirts ripped or if my dog Dusty chewed a hole into one of my toys, she was prompt and reliable enough to sew it back together in one piece. Still, as I grew older I was mesmerized at how talented she really was. She would often make quilts unique to each member of her family and was extra special to them in one way or another.

My Poppy, for instance, is a big fan of the Chicago Blackhawks, and when they won their first Stanley Cup in four decades in 2010, she celebrated by sewing him a Chicago Blackhawks quilt made from various Blackhawks merchandise. Before I graduated high school, Grandy made my parents and I our own family quilt made from photos of some of our favorite trips together. Wherever she went, Grandy made sure that others experienced the same joys of quilting as she did. She was as good at making people smile as she was stitching a thread.

I couldn’t even begin to tell you how much my Ducky Schwartz meant to me – to my entire family and to the many families outside of our own. When I went to her funeral service, I was proud but not surprised to find that over a hundred people came to support Grandy and Poppy, and they shared stories and memories of Grandy and her little laugh-filled adventures with them. As I looked around the room of the funeral home, I can’t tell you how astounded I was to see all the people in there, all the lives she touched, and all the families she made despite not being related to them by blood. That was the person she was. Whether she knew you for a day or several years, your happiness mattered to her. I think that’s a quality more people need to learn to possess.

I don’t know how to describe the feelings I’ve felt since burying my Grandy several weeks ago. At times, it feels like she hasn’t left at all and I can feel her as if she’s standing right next to me. Other times, there’s a deep, gaping hole in my heart that feels like I could cry all the tears in the world and it still wouldn’t encapsulate how much I miss Grandy. But the one thing I’ve felt most through all of the ups and downs of mourning her is gratefulness. I’m so grateful to have had not just her, but all four of my grandparents for the past 26 years. I’m grateful to have experienced so much with her, to have loved her and to have shared a part of our lives with each other. I’m grateful that out of all of her flurry of grandchildren and great-grandchildren, I got to be one small piece of that giant and colorful puzzle. I’m grateful to have known her in her beautiful life because she’s given me something to aspire to, just like everyone else in our sprawling and loving little family.

I love you Ducky Schwartz. I’ll see you on Friday for Farkel.

Joan “Ducky” Dolinar

1936 – 2019

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